DOG ATTACK: No bite in leash law: Pointe Claire resident

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Raffy Boudjikanian
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Pointe Claire man bites back

Pointe Claire resident Peter Ascoli is claiming local police were negligent in not pursuing the matter of a dog owner on his street whose pet attacked him, his wife and their own canine. "Why did they not go give the guy a ticket?" Asked Ascoli.

A resident of Stillview Street, he said the latest incident occurred on or around Sept. 25, when he was walking his own pet, a tiny schnauzer, along with his wife one evening.

According to Ascoli, the roughly 100-pound black Labrador dog emerged abruptly from the yard of a home on Stillview, and tried to attack them. He said his wife sat down on the dog to try to pacify it, which is when the owners showed up. "He's really friendly and everything's OK," Ascoli said the owners told him, and it was at that point the dog broke free and bit into Ascoli's pet schnauzer.

Eventually, the owners were able to drag the dog away and Ascoli had to bring his schnauzer to a veterinarian. "Is there a leash law in Pointe Claire?" Ascoli wondered. He said he called police that night as soon as he got home, but they never showed up, and he had to go file a complaint in person at the station.

Ascoli said police claimed they could not go to the owner's home and enforce any bylaws about leashes in the city.

He theorized the lax attitude of the police could have to do with the fact they are undergoing union negotiations, as he has seen some of them patrolling without their police uniforms.

This was not the first time Ascoli has had problems with this particular dog, he said. He claimed the black lab had once chased his wife as she was walking home and she had had to call him to pick her up by car in order to avoid being attacked. "The police are negotiating new contracts, as are the Pointe Claire workers," said Pointe Claire Mayor Bill McMurchie. However, he said he could not comment on whether or not this has affected their work.

McMurchie added there definitely is a leash law in Pointe Claire, and breaking it can subject dog owners to fines.

He said dog attacks are not usually a big problem in the city. "Occurrences happen," he admit, but they often simply involve a dog scaring someone with a loud bark rather than an actual attack.

Montreal police station 5, which serves Pointe Claire, did not return phone calls for comment as of press time.

Organizations: Ascoli

Geographic location: Pointe Claire, Stillview Street, Montreal

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  • Barney Flintstone
    February 17, 2010 - 14:18

    No one cares about dog bites unless the dog has a square head/short hair/whip tail and the Media can allege that it`s a 'pit bull'. Most people in Canada wouldn`t know a "Pit Bull" Breed* if they tripped over one. www.understand-a-bull.com/Findthebull/findpitbull_v4.swf Simple solution-Keep your dogs on leashes,enforce that law and throw the book at owners who don`t comply. And don`t get you "facts" about dog bites from Media stories.I`m surprised this Lab story even made it into the Paper.They usually only report alleged 'pit bull' "attacks" because that sells! www.ontla.on.ca/committee-proceedings/transcripts/files_html/2005-01-24_M009.htm#P672_181318 [quote]An argument is sometimes made that, while all dogs bite, only a few breeds cause serious injury when they attack. Again, this hypothesis does not withstand scrutiny. A study by the Canadian hospitals injury reporting and prevention program (CHIRPP) examined the dog breeds involved in attacks that were serious enough that the victim sought medical attention at one of eight reporting hospitals. The study revealed that 50 different types of purebreds and 33 types of crossbreeds had been involved in the attacks, the most common breeds being German shepherds, cocker spaniels, Rottweilers and golden retrievers.[/quote] I guess so called 'pit bull' victims are treating themselves at home. Start holding ALL irresponsible Owners of ALL Breeds/types responsible for the behavior of their dogs. The Owner of this Lab needs to be charged. There are NO dangerous Breeds. There are irresponsible Owners. "Pit Bulls" were not bred to kill and there is no such thing as a Pit Bull "type"...Stereotype much Bill? http://badrap-blog.blogspot.com/2008/09/minnesota-thugs.html

  • Bill Allen
    February 17, 2010 - 14:18

    Dogs and Aggression Last year I used Google Alert to get some insight on dog bites and attacks. For those of you that don’t know about this service, you give Google a topic and it e-mails you news releases on that topic. So, for the last year I have been getting on average of, lets say, four alerts a day, and at least one report every day. Now, if I disregard the reports that are non relevant (articles that happen to have the words dog and bite or dog and attack in the story) then disregard the articles that are multiples of the same stories, I am still left with a staggering amount of violent incidences between humans and K-9’s. Reading through every word of every article is not my cup of tea. My research skills are not great. However, I have trained myself to at least skim through all the articles to find the age of the human victim and the breed of the dog involved. Many of the attack releases are horrifying. Most involve young or small children, the dogs are (usually) known to the victim and of course “Pit Bull” is the news popular breed. I am not writing this article to bash Pit Bulls. I would never own one, because I am not a Pit Bull “type”. Nor am I a Poodle or German Shepard “type”. I think for the most part this breed is getting its reputation because of irresponsible humans that have no idea how to manage a dog that has been bred to be a killer. Do Jack Russell Terriers not bite? We breed them to kill. No one wants to take the time to read a story about a ferocious JRT. But we do pay attention to the dangerous breed attacks. As well, we have to take into consideration the severity of a Pit Bull attack. Part of my dog related business involves dog attack training for utility companies. These are the people that go to your house to read meters or to service equipment and it’s usually in the same place where many people STORE their dogs. I have labeled these dogs “backyard lawn ornaments”. The utility workers tell me their biggest fear is going into a fenced yard and seeing a dog on the end of a chain. They also tell me that some people will actually chain the dog to the meter, or build the dog run around the services to the house. The meter still needs to be read so there is usually some type of confrontation between the worker and the dog or the worker and the dog’s owner when asked to remove the animal from the area. It is easy to see that people that keep dogs this way did not get a dog for companionship. This dog is nothing more than a tool and eventually grows to be a social misfit. If it escapes or a child wanders into the yard the outcome is usually grim. Dogs, like humans, are social animals. They need interaction with other living beings to be mentally stable. A dog that grows up on the end of a chain will not develop the social skills needed to suppress the attack or bite reflexes when confronted by another dog or human. Understanding pack mentality is crucial to raising a dangerous breed pup. There are many other reasons why dogs develop aggression problems. Dogs are naturally aggressive. It is a survival instinct they are born with. The aggressive pup in the litter gets the most nutrition, warmth and affection. Once humans are in charge of the nutrition, warmth, and affection, care must be taken to insure that the pup knows its place in the human pack. The pup must be raised as a dog, not a human. Humanizing a dog will cause aggressive behavior. Issues can come from something as trivial as letting your dog on the furniture. Height is status in the pack. A dominant dog will stand over the submissive dog to show dominance. So letting your dog sit or sleep with the human pack members can give the dog a sense of authority that needs to be protected by aggression. Not controlling the entrance to the house can cause aggression issues. If your dog charges the door at the sound of a knock or a doorbell, it is a dominant response to protect the pack. A stable dog will know to alert the pack by barking once or twice and let the pack leader deal with the intruder. When you take your dog for a walk, the dog should be the last one through the door. In fact the dog should sit at an open door until it is allowed to go out. These may seem like small details to humans, but in a dogs mind Alpha Status is everything. If your dog is showing signs of aggression look for the triggers. What causes this dog to react violently? It may be something as subtle as a food dish by a door, or just being frustrated from lack of exercise. Bill A

  • Barney Flintstone
    February 10, 2010 - 12:55

    No one cares about dog bites unless the dog has a square head/short hair/whip tail and the Media can allege that it`s a 'pit bull'. Most people in Canada wouldn`t know a "Pit Bull" Breed* if they tripped over one. www.understand-a-bull.com/Findthebull/findpitbull_v4.swf Simple solution-Keep your dogs on leashes,enforce that law and throw the book at owners who don`t comply. And don`t get you "facts" about dog bites from Media stories.I`m surprised this Lab story even made it into the Paper.They usually only report alleged 'pit bull' "attacks" because that sells! www.ontla.on.ca/committee-proceedings/transcripts/files_html/2005-01-24_M009.htm#P672_181318 [quote]An argument is sometimes made that, while all dogs bite, only a few breeds cause serious injury when they attack. Again, this hypothesis does not withstand scrutiny. A study by the Canadian hospitals injury reporting and prevention program (CHIRPP) examined the dog breeds involved in attacks that were serious enough that the victim sought medical attention at one of eight reporting hospitals. The study revealed that 50 different types of purebreds and 33 types of crossbreeds had been involved in the attacks, the most common breeds being German shepherds, cocker spaniels, Rottweilers and golden retrievers.[/quote] I guess so called 'pit bull' victims are treating themselves at home. Start holding ALL irresponsible Owners of ALL Breeds/types responsible for the behavior of their dogs. The Owner of this Lab needs to be charged. There are NO dangerous Breeds. There are irresponsible Owners. "Pit Bulls" were not bred to kill and there is no such thing as a Pit Bull "type"...Stereotype much Bill? http://badrap-blog.blogspot.com/2008/09/minnesota-thugs.html

  • Bill Allen
    February 10, 2010 - 12:55

    Dogs and Aggression Last year I used Google Alert to get some insight on dog bites and attacks. For those of you that don’t know about this service, you give Google a topic and it e-mails you news releases on that topic. So, for the last year I have been getting on average of, lets say, four alerts a day, and at least one report every day. Now, if I disregard the reports that are non relevant (articles that happen to have the words dog and bite or dog and attack in the story) then disregard the articles that are multiples of the same stories, I am still left with a staggering amount of violent incidences between humans and K-9’s. Reading through every word of every article is not my cup of tea. My research skills are not great. However, I have trained myself to at least skim through all the articles to find the age of the human victim and the breed of the dog involved. Many of the attack releases are horrifying. Most involve young or small children, the dogs are (usually) known to the victim and of course “Pit Bull” is the news popular breed. I am not writing this article to bash Pit Bulls. I would never own one, because I am not a Pit Bull “type”. Nor am I a Poodle or German Shepard “type”. I think for the most part this breed is getting its reputation because of irresponsible humans that have no idea how to manage a dog that has been bred to be a killer. Do Jack Russell Terriers not bite? We breed them to kill. No one wants to take the time to read a story about a ferocious JRT. But we do pay attention to the dangerous breed attacks. As well, we have to take into consideration the severity of a Pit Bull attack. Part of my dog related business involves dog attack training for utility companies. These are the people that go to your house to read meters or to service equipment and it’s usually in the same place where many people STORE their dogs. I have labeled these dogs “backyard lawn ornaments”. The utility workers tell me their biggest fear is going into a fenced yard and seeing a dog on the end of a chain. They also tell me that some people will actually chain the dog to the meter, or build the dog run around the services to the house. The meter still needs to be read so there is usually some type of confrontation between the worker and the dog or the worker and the dog’s owner when asked to remove the animal from the area. It is easy to see that people that keep dogs this way did not get a dog for companionship. This dog is nothing more than a tool and eventually grows to be a social misfit. If it escapes or a child wanders into the yard the outcome is usually grim. Dogs, like humans, are social animals. They need interaction with other living beings to be mentally stable. A dog that grows up on the end of a chain will not develop the social skills needed to suppress the attack or bite reflexes when confronted by another dog or human. Understanding pack mentality is crucial to raising a dangerous breed pup. There are many other reasons why dogs develop aggression problems. Dogs are naturally aggressive. It is a survival instinct they are born with. The aggressive pup in the litter gets the most nutrition, warmth and affection. Once humans are in charge of the nutrition, warmth, and affection, care must be taken to insure that the pup knows its place in the human pack. The pup must be raised as a dog, not a human. Humanizing a dog will cause aggressive behavior. Issues can come from something as trivial as letting your dog on the furniture. Height is status in the pack. A dominant dog will stand over the submissive dog to show dominance. So letting your dog sit or sleep with the human pack members can give the dog a sense of authority that needs to be protected by aggression. Not controlling the entrance to the house can cause aggression issues. If your dog charges the door at the sound of a knock or a doorbell, it is a dominant response to protect the pack. A stable dog will know to alert the pack by barking once or twice and let the pack leader deal with the intruder. When you take your dog for a walk, the dog should be the last one through the door. In fact the dog should sit at an open door until it is allowed to go out. These may seem like small details to humans, but in a dogs mind Alpha Status is everything. If your dog is showing signs of aggression look for the triggers. What causes this dog to react violently? It may be something as subtle as a food dish by a door, or just being frustrated from lack of exercise. Bill A

  • Brent
    February 08, 2010 - 11:14

    The rate of incidents caused by irresponsible owners is growing. They off-leash their dogs in public ares, playgrounds, beaches, they don't care to pick up after their dogs and most gravely they behave arrogantly, vehemantly, idiotically towards those who try to remind / warn them. WE NEED TIGHTER ENFORCEMENT WITH HIGHER FINES. If this issue is not justified by law makers and appliers, people might start taking measures to justify it themselves, which takes everybody into chaos.